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Issue 3

SHORT STORY
The English Muffin Critic
Arthur Davis

SHORT STORY<br>The English Muffin Critic<br>Arthur Davis

Two spies meet at a wedding in Arthur Davis' short story, "The English Muffin Critic."

“No silencer there. Someone’s bound to hear the shot, especially in this stone wall chamber with two very large vaulted openings facing the street.”

                “It’s really a beautiful church and quite a shame to mess up your elegant tux from Hiding Roosevelt & Clyde, I believe?”

                “Blyton Huxley, their most senior fitter.”

                “Yes. Couldn’t quite put my finger on which of their tailors it must have been to have stitched you such a fine suit,” she said gesturing with the muzzle of the Beretta at a small wooden bench in the corner. 

FLASH FICTION
Things to do While Waiting For Snow
Cari Scribner

FLASH FICTION<br>Things to do While Waiting For Snow<br>Cari Scribner

Grieving and life mingle in this flash fiction piece by Cari Scribner, "Things to do While Waiting For Snow."

Your son asks for an egg sandwich. You can’t remember how he likes his eggs, so you cook them over easy. The seeping yolks distress you. You cook the eggs some more. Half the English muffin gets stuck in the toaster. When you poke it with a fork, it rips to shreds. You eat one of the broken pieces, burning your lip. You utter choice words. 

SHORT STORY
My Wife
Maria Benet

SHORT STORY<br>My Wife<br>Maria Benet

In the short story, "My Wife" by Maria Benet a wife's hobby becomes her obsession, but happens to the spouse she's left behind?

I didn't set out to cheat on my wife. That was not my intention. It wasn't really about her. When I went down to the hotel bar later that night I wasn't looking for anything to happen, but then again, I wasn't exactly not looking.

 

 

SHORT STORY
Trapped in a Tower
William Metcalfe

SHORT STORY<br>Trapped in a Tower<br>William Metcalfe

Two boys get more than they bargained for when they turn an abandoned building into their afternoon hangout. Read more in "Trapped in a Tower" a short story by William Metcalfe.

Like hardened criminals from the movies, we dashed up the stairs to the third floor to avoid the police. A movie crook would have a gat, but we didn’t even have a rock. We were ready to holler for Mother though.         Did the cops purposefully stomp on the stairs to make the building tremble? Were they expecting us to faint thus making our capture easier?